P!nk: All I Know So Far
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P!nk: All I Know So Far 2021 Movie Review Poster Trailer Online

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P!nk: All I Know So Far 2021 Movie Review Poster Trailer Online

Director: Michael Gracey

Writers: Jory Anast, Michael Gracey

Stars: Pink, Carey Hart, Willow Sage Hart

Pink’s husband, on daddy duty as he accompanies her during the tour, is former professional motocross competitor Carey Hart, her partner of 19 years. And while Hart takes on all duties behind-the-scenes to see his wife soar, his revelation too, tugs at the heart strings.

It is difficult to put a finger on what eggs one on to watch the documentary on American singer Pink, right till the end. This isn’t to say that Michael Gracey’s portrayal of her life is a feeble attempt. On the contrary, Gracey does such a fine job at depicting a seemingly simple story of the goings-on in the life of a not-so-regular American family, that despite the absence of thrills, this writer found herself wearing a smile throughout its 99-minute runtime. 

Pink: All I Know So Far may not be like that enthralling soundtrack that grabs attention with crescendos. Instead, think of it as that pleasant balletic rendition that keeps you swaying while it plays in the backdrop. Filmed during the three weeks that led up to her Wimberley performance of the Beautiful Trauma World Tour in 2018-2019, the documentary is, at its crux, a story of a mother who refused to choose between parenting, and pursuing a fulfilling career. For Pink, there is no segregation. She doesn’t ‘juggle’ between rehearsals and attending to her kids, but lets her children — eight-year-old Willow Sage, and Jameson Moon, two — interact with dancers, play with the crew, and match her steps, as she gears up for D-day. 

Amid abundant kisses shared with her children, Pink gives us an unfiltered view of her life as a mother, glimpses of which her fans have seen, and celebrated, during shows and interviews. You have to be a Pink-admirer to enjoy this offering, which, in several ways, is self-congratulatory. But if you’re willing to look beyond the filmic paean that any project approved by the very muse on whom it is based, is, there’s a lot to admire here.

For this writer, it is the vulnerability of the singer, as well as all those associated with her, that stands out. Pink’s conversations with Willow — graceful, and tad mature for her age — are easily the documentary’s highlights. For the most part, she can have one applaud her for her parenting skills. Almost immediately, she makes her disappointment evident when the young girl tells her she feels “invisible” due to the attention given to her two-year-old sibling. Pink is pained, but not apprehensive when telling her sick child battling a cough, that the singer must keep her distance to avoid getting infected ahead of her show. “Mom, fail,” she announces to herself, when she turns down son Jameson’s request for attention, pointing him to his father instead, so that she can prepare for her gig. 

Pink’s husband, on daddy duty as he accompanies her during the tour, is former professional motocross competitor Carey Hart, her partner of 19 years. And while Hart takes on all duties behind-the-scenes to see his wife soar, his revelation too, tugs at  the heart strings.

Willow was only a toddler when Hart participated in one of his last prominent races. As for Jameson, he can only celebrate his father’s victories via videos available online. “I wish there was a piece that they [his kids] could remember,” he says of his professional successes, adding “like what they are experiencing with Alecia [Pink]. You know, being on tour and seeing what mama does. I wish I had that.”

For those hoping to get a low-down of Pink’s journey, this documentary doesn’t offer a full picture. It showcases only one part of the life of a singer who has become a fan-favourite due to her empathy, strength, and generosity, despite the criticism she faced for looking unlike any quintessential pop star.

While a picture of all being well between Pink and Hart is painted here, fans know that the couple has broken off on a couple of occasions, before reconciling again each time. They have reportedly been in couple’s therapy for 17 years — a fact they credit for their long-running marriage. Unfortunately, what transpires behind pulling together such a relationship is only left to one’s imagination. 

We wish though, that the documentary had exploited Pink’s music more efficiently instead of lazily recruiting it during the assorted 30-second concert rushes peppered across the film. For the most part, however, this offering on one of America’s most adored singers, is a worthy watch.

P!nk: All I Know So Far 2021 Movie Review Poster Trailer Online