Dolly Parton: A MusiCares Tribute
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Dolly Parton: A MusiCares Tribute 2021 Movie Review Poster Trailer Online

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Dolly Parton: A MusiCares Tribute 2021 Movie Review Poster Trailer Online

Each year MusiCares, the non-profit arm of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences bestows Person of the Year honors to a particular artist, and in 2019, Dolly Parton became the first country artist to receive the honor. This accompanying concert special celebrates Parton’s storied career and consummate songcraft with appearances from a vibrant cross-section of her peers and fellow performers, including Cyrus (Parton’s goddaughter), Mendes, Pink, Leon Bridges, Willie Nelson, Emmylou Harris and Linda Ronstadt, Brandi Carlile, Mavis Staples, Kacey Musgraves, Chris Stapleton, Garth Brooks, and Trisha Yearwood.

That opening number rides along on stately guitar ellipses from Ronson until Cyrus, with a nod to Dolly seated at the best table in the Los Angeles Convention Center, opens up her vocal to full throttle. From there, Little Big Town appear as the evenings hosts, and they set up the next performance, Nelson and Carlile dueting on a lovely version of Parton’s “Everything’s Beautiful (In It’s Own Way).” Musgraves and Katy Perry then join forces on the 1977 hit “Here You Come Again,” and Norah Jones, appearing at a piano in her alt country configuration as Puss n Boots alongside Sasha Dobson and Catherine Popper, delivers a fine-tuned take on the title track from “The Grass is Blue,” which netted Parton a Best Bluegrass Album Grammy in 2001. Shows put on by the Grammy people love to showcase their Grammy winners, and this Grammys-produced evening is no exception.

Elsewhere in this Parton tribute, Stapleton ramps up the elemental honky-tonk in “9 to 5,” Stapleton and Bridges are joined onstage by a full gospel choir, Gospel legend Yolanda Adams offers a stately version of “I Will Always Love You” (the high notes are a highlight), and Harris and Ronstadt take a walk down memory lane as they recall their collaborative work. “Together at last, we did what all singers do when gathered in a living room,” Ronstadt tells the audience. “We sat on the floor and sang a song.” When Parton herself finally takes the stage, it’s for a speech full of her typical graciousness, homespun humor, strident feminism, and endearing sass.

Each year MusiCares, the non-profit arm of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences bestows Person of the Year honors to a particular artist, and in 2019, Dolly Parton became the first country artist to receive the honor. This accompanying concert special celebrates Parton’s storied career and consummate songcraft with appearances from a vibrant cross-section of her peers and fellow performers, including Cyrus (Parton’s goddaughter), Mendes, Pink, Leon Bridges, Willie Nelson, Emmylou Harris and Linda Ronstadt, Brandi Carlile, Mavis Staples, Kacey Musgraves, Chris Stapleton, Garth Brooks, and Trisha Yearwood.

That opening number rides along on stately guitar ellipses from Ronson until Cyrus, with a nod to Dolly seated at the best table in the Los Angeles Convention Center, opens up her vocal to full throttle. From there, Little Big Town appear as the evenings hosts, and they set up the next performance, Nelson and Carlile dueting on a lovely version of Parton’s “Everything’s Beautiful (In It’s Own Way).” Musgraves and Katy Perry then join forces on the 1977 hit “Here You Come Again,” and Norah Jones, appearing at a piano in her alt country configuration as Puss n Boots alongside Sasha Dobson and Catherine Popper, delivers a fine-tuned take on the title track from “The Grass is Blue,” which netted Parton a Best Bluegrass Album Grammy in 2001. Shows put on by the Grammy people love to showcase their Grammy winners, and this Grammys-produced evening is no exception.

Elsewhere in this Parton tribute, Stapleton ramps up the elemental honky-tonk in “9 to 5,” Stapleton and Bridges are joined onstage by a full gospel choir, Gospel legend Yolanda Adams offers a stately version of “I Will Always Love You” (the high notes are a highlight), and Harris and Ronstadt take a walk down memory lane as they recall their collaborative work. “Together at last, we did what all singers do when gathered in a living room,” Ronstadt tells the audience. “We sat on the floor and sang a song.” When Parton herself finally takes the stage, it’s for a speech full of her typical graciousness, homespun humor, strident feminism, and endearing sass.

Dolly Parton: A MusiCares Tribute 2021 Movie Review Poster Trailer Online